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Freelance Marketplaces

10 Best Freelance Marketplaces

With 55 million people freelancing in the United States alone, it is fair to say that the work force is shifting from the standard 9-to-5. With that are several new websites and apps popping up everyday to help freelancers find work. Below you’ll find the 10 best freelance marketplaces for both employers and freelancers.

 

Upwork

1) Upwork

Based in Mountain View, California, the fusion of former companies oDesk and Elance, Upwork is the world’s largest freelance marketplace with 3 million jobs posted annually. They have the largest variety of freelance jobs on their site ranging from web development to finance and accounting. They offer short-term and long-term projects, hourly or fixed cost work and entry-level through expert-level freelancers.

Pros:

  • Most jobs posted annually
  • Largest variety of freelance positions
  • Separation by different skill levels
  • Only pay for work you are satisfied with
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Sliding pay scale brings average project cost to nearly 15%
  • Oversaturation on the site makes it hard for newer freelancers to find work
  • Site is quantity over quality regarding level of work because top freelancers are constantly being outbid and leaving the site
  • App functionality not as strong as physical website
  • Site crashes and is under repair often
  • Vetting freelancers is time consuming because of the amount of replies per posted project

 

freelancer

2) Freelancer.com

Based in Sydney, Australia, Freelancer.com is the freelance marketplace with the most total registered users (20.3 million as of December 2016). They also offer a large variety of different freelance positions, but what sets them apart from other freelance marketplaces are their contests. Freelancer.com lets it’s users compete against each other to prove their skills and win the jobs.

Pros:

  • Most registered users of any freelance marketplace
  • Contests let you showcase your skills to win work
  • Solid technical infrastructure on both site and application
  • Easy to use

Cons:

  • Heavy over-saturation on the site makes it nearly impossible to find work as a new freelancer
  • Contests are a lot of work and time for potentially no outcome
  • Vetting freelancers is time consuming because of the amount of replies per posted project
  • High cost per project at around 13%

 

peopleperhour

3) Peopleperhour

Based in London, United Kingdom, Peopleperhour is a freelance marketplace that focuses mostly on web projects. Its network consists of about 250k active users (180k freelancers and 70k clients) and counting. With the majority of the 70k clients being small businesses, Peopleperhour is considered to be a business-oriented freelance marketplace.

Pros:

  • Offers a higher quality of work versus competing sites for web based projects
  • Platform may be the best overall tech platform
  • Workstream function lets you manage and control all projects and freelancers in one place with ease
  • Fee structure rewards projects that cost more than £175 (3.5%)

Cons:

  • Fee structure penalizes projects that cost less than £175 (15%)
  • Based in the UK, projects are in pounds sterling meaning foreign users may incur an international transaction and conversion fee for each project
  • Freelancers that don’t specialize in web work won’t be able to find much work on this site

 

Guru

4) Guru

Based in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, Guru is a freelance marketplace that uses SmartMatch technology to match resumes and other information about job applicants to postings. They also developed a candidate profiling system using industrial and organizational psychology to better understand a candidate’s suitability for a particular job.

Pros:

  • Experienced freelance professionals have an easier time finding work due to SmartMatch technology
  • One of the lowest per project costs at 8.95%
  • Work Room is highly advanced and allows users to create agreements, define milestones, communicate and share documents without ever having to leave the site
  • One of few sites to include features like skill tests and search boost

Cons:

  • Limited bids of 120 per year if on free plan. Otherwise monthly costs start at $8.95 per month and grow to $39.95 per month while increasing bids from 120 to 600 per year
  • All extra features unlocked only with monthly memberships or one-time fees
  • Barrier to entry higher for newer and inexperienced freelancers due to SmartMatch technology

 

LinkedIn ProFindr freelance marketplace

5) LinkedIn ProFinder

Based in Mountain View, California, LinkedIn ProFinder is the newest branch of the business and employment-oriented social network. ProFinder is a freelance marketplace that offers a wide range of services backed by each freelancer’s LinkedIn profile.

Pros:

  • Platform able to piggyback off of LinkedIn’s vast network of users
  • No fees for clients/employers posting jobs
  • LinkedIn’s ProFinder concierges available to help and answer questions every step of the way

Cons:

  • Freelancers have to pay for a LinkedIn Premium Business Plus membership ($59.99 per month) to have access to the ProFinder after the first 10 proposals
  • LinkedIn is merely the broker for meeting clients/employers; payments are processed outside of LinkedIn through a method agreed upon by freelancer and employer
  • Because payments are processed offsite, satisfactory work is not guaranteed nor is payment
  • No rating review system

 

fiverr marketplace

6) Fiverr

Based in Tel Aviv, Israel, Fiverr is a freelance marketplace/ labor platform that focuses primarily on gigs. Their goal is to become the “Amazon of the gig economy.” Fiverr is less of a conventional marketplace and more a place for users to make extra money doing unique tasks. As the name suggests, gigs start at only $5.

Pros:

  • Offers the most diverse gigs of any other freelance marketplace
  • Anyone who has a unique skill can make additional income through the site
  • Easy to use and navigate
  • One of the best applications of any freelance marketplace

Cons:

  • Repertoire of offerings stem from $5 base gigs, creating low quality of work
  • Least professional/formal business marketplace
  • One of the highest per project fees (20%)

 

99designs marketplace

7) 99designs

Based in San Francisco, California, 99designs is a freelance marketplace strictly for designers.   Users create contests where several designers compete against each other to win business. Unlike Freelancer.com, the contest feature is 99design’s only option for first time user.

Pros:

  • Due to the competitive state of the site, quality of work tends to be higher
  • Even losing bids usually get feedback on their work so they can learn
  • Money-back guarantee

Cons:

  • Freelance marketplace only for designers
  • Prices per request are much higher than competitors, starting at $299 for the lowest level (bronze) to $1299 for the highest level (platinum)

 

toptal marketplace

8) Toptal

Known for being a completely virtual organization without any offices, Toptal is more of a freelance recruitment company than a freelance marketplace. Companies use Toptal to get the top 3% of freelancers in web development, design, and finance. Instead of being able to browse, users answer a few questions and then Toptal finds the best freelancer for the project from their database of experienced professionals.

Pros:

  • Highest quality of work offered among any freelance site
  • Users save time because they don’t have to vet freelancers

Cons:

  • Costs range from $60 – $95 on the hourly scale, $1000 – $1600 per week for part time and $2000 – $3200 per week for full time
  • Platform only for developers, designers and finance professionals

 

craigslist

9) Craigslist

We know Craigslist, which is based in San Francisco, California, is more of a job board than a freelance marketplace. However a lot of freelancers swear by it. If you have the patience to sort through endless scams, Craigslist can be an excellent source of freelance work. It’s also one of the few sites where you can find gigs locally.

Pros:

  • Work found is often easy and offers a good price in return
  • Can search for gigs locally, if you prefer in-office work

Cons:

  • Have to have patience to sort through scams
  • Craigslist is merely the broker and payments are exchanged offsite so payments and work are not secured or guaranteed by host
  • Platform not designed to allow freelancers and clients/employers communicate and share documents through the site making project management difficult

 

myclyq freelance marketplace

10) MyClyq

Based in Los Angeles, California, MyClyq is the newest freelance marketplace to hit the market with their beta becoming available to the public in October 2016. They help clients/employers find trusted freelancers faster by utilizing each of their networks. Each user profile includes links to 4 trusted partners in an attempt to bring word of mouth referrals online. We may be a little biased about this platform because it’s ours, but check it out. You won’t be disappointed. MyClyq Explainer

Pros:

  • Clyq referral system increases freelancer visibility and gives clients/employers a warm lead without ever having to speak to someone
  • Lowest cost of any marketplace at only 9% per project and no monthly fee
  • Only freelance marketplace that offers a deep entertainment industry category
  • Allows clients/employers 3 separate ways to find freelancers (posting a job, browsing for freelancers and using their Clyq) to save valuable time
  • Secure payment and milestone structure allows users to only pay for work they are satisfied with.

Cons:

  • Brand new platform still gaining traction
  • Lack of jobs on the site
  • Small beta glitches still exist throughout the site

We hope this article has given you enough insight about each freelance marketplace to help you find the one that suits you best.


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